Pope Plea For Peace And Mentions Nigeria During His Easter Sunday Message.

Pope Francis has delivered a passionate plea for peace in his first Easter Sunday message since being elected.

Francis used his “Urbi et Orbi” address to call for peace in Africa, Asia and the Middle East, where he singled out “above all dear Syria”.

“Christ is our peace, and through him we implore peace for all the world,” the Pope told thousands in the square.

Easter is the most important festival in the Christian calendar and pilgrims have attended church across the world, reports the BBC.

Pope Francis, formerly Buenos Aires Archbishop Jorge Mario Bergoglio, was elected on 13 March, becoming the first non-European pope for almost 1,300 years.

He replaced Benedict XVI, who held the office for eight years and became the first pontiff in more than 700 years to resign, saying he no longer had the physical strength to continue.

In his Urbi et Orbi (To the city and the world) speech, Pope Francis began with a simple “Happy Easter!”

The Pope, who has begun his tenure by emphasising humility, went on: “Christ has risen! What a joy it is for me to announce this message… I would like it to go out to every house and every family, especially where the suffering is greatest, in hospitals, in prisons.”

Later in his speech, Pope Francis said: “We ask the risen Jesus, who turns death into life, to change hatred into love, vengeance into forgiveness, war into peace.”

The Pope then mentioned troubled regions of the world in turn.

“Peace for the Middle East, and particularly between Israelis and Palestinians, who struggle to find the road of agreement, that they may willingly and courageously resume negotiations to end a conflict that has lasted all too long.

“Peace in Iraq, that every act of violence may end, and above all for dear Syria, for its people torn by conflict and for the many refugees who await help and comfort.”

For Africa, the Pope referred to Mali, Nigeria – “where attacks sadly continue” – the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Central African Republic.

He added: “Peace in Asia, above all on the Korean peninsula: may disagreements be overcome and a renewed spirit of reconciliation grow.”

Pope Francis concluded by saying: “Peace in the whole world, still divided by greed looking for easy gain, wounded by the selfishness which threatens human life and the family, selfishness that continues in human trafficking, the most extensive form of slavery in this 21st Century.”

The BBC’s David Willey reports from Rome that the 76-year-old Pope Francis has already set a new style at the Vatican, reaching out easily to ordinary people and expressing his thoughts in a conversational way that is easy to understand.

He has surprised many of the clerics who work at the Vatican, eating in a communal dining room with other priests and clearly finding much traditional Vatican ceremonial tedious, our correspondent says.

Rather than moving into grand papal apartments, Pope Francis has remained in a Vatican guesthouse, where he has been inviting ordinary people to morning Mass.

One pilgrim in Rome on Sunday, Briton Tina Hughes, said that Francis represented a “new beginning”.

“I think he brings something special. He connects with people. I feel good about him,” she told Reuters.

In the days before Easter, the Pope had reached out to women and Muslims.

During a Holy Thursday Mass at a youth detention centre he washed and kissed the feet of 12 people, including two girls and two Muslims, and in a Good Friday procession referred to the “friendship of our Muslim brothers and sisters” in the Middle East.

After Easter, the Pope will have to begin tackling the key issues facing the Catholic Church, such as the Vatican bureaucracy, the future of the Vatican bank and the clerical sexual abuse scandal.

Vatican watchers will be keeping a keen eye on new appointments to key positions.

Advertisements

Forbes Magazine Ranks Aliko Dangote As The 43rd Richest African Man

Alhaji Aliko Dangote, is the 43rd richest man on earth today, according to the 2013 list of world’s billionaires, compiled by Forbes Magazine. He is worth $16.1 billion, with assets from his cement, sugar, flour and other businesses. He is number one in Nigeria and Africa. It would be recalled that Dangote was number 76 on the list last year.
Mexico’s Carlos Slim, who has taken a hit from the slump in the share price of his America Movil telecoms group since the list was calculated as of February 14, remained the richest person with a fortune of $73 billion, and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates held on to the No. 2 spot with a net worth of $67 billion.

Spain’s Amancio Ortega, the co-founder of the Inditex fashion group, leapt over Warren Buffett and France’s Bernard Arnault to become the world’s third richest person on Forbes’ 2013 annual ranking of billionaires, with an estimated net worth of $57 billion.

Ortega’s fortune increased $19.5 billion, the biggest gain for any of the billionaires, from the report in 2012. He jumped two places and bumped Buffett, chairman and chief executive of conglomerate Berkshire Hathaway Inc, with a fortune of $53.5 billion out of the top three to the No. 4 spot for the first time since 2000.

“Warren had a great year, it’s just that Amancio Ortega had a better year,” Forbes magazine editor Randall Lane said of the co-founder of Zara. “He has one of the dominant apparel lines in Europe.”
Arnault, of the LVMH luxury goods group, dropped to 10th place with $29 billion.
Slim, 73, made much of his fortune in telecommunications but also branched out into retail, commodities, finance and energy.
“To see Carlos Slim again broaden his lead and certify himself as the richest man in the world is a statement that wealth truly is global and not an American monopoly like it sometimes felt for many decades,” Lane added in an interview.

Dangote, 55, retains his position as Africa’s richest man for the third year in a row. The past year has been eventful for him. In October, he sold off a controlling stake in his flour milling company to Tiger Brands of South Africa. He pocketed $190 million in cash. In February, his Dangote Sugar Refineries acquired a 95 per cent stake in Nigerian sugar producer Savannah Sugar in a bid to maintain its dominant position in the Nigerian sugar industry. Dangote stepped up his philanthropy in the past year, giving over $100 million to causes ranging from education to health, flood relief, poverty alleviation and the arts. He also acquired a yacht, which he named after his mother Amiya.

The second Nigerian on the list is Otunba Mike Adenuga, who is 267th richest on earth, second in Nigeria and 5th in Africa.

Midnight Crew – E Gimme Money

Midnight Crew is back againnnnn! (You remember them? IGWE) Here is a fusion of Rock, Dubstep and the contemporary Fuji…. They featured GAMEMAN – a young talented rapper. The song is produced by FLO…..
Watch out for Repping the Kingdom which features MIKE ABDUL ( Midnight Crew), KORE (INFINITY) and more… Produced by ROYALPRIEST for HYBREED STUDIOS…

DOWNLOAD

Things Fall Apart Author (Chinua Achebe) Dies At 82.

The Award winning Nigerian Writer Chinua Achebe is dead.

According to a report published by the BBC coupled with Sahara Reporters, Chinua Achebe, the Nigerian author of the famous masterpiece who is one of the world’s most celebrated writers and author of the classic novel Things Fall Apart, is dead.

Achebe, who was the David and Mariana Fisher Professor of Literature at Brown University, died last night in a hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Professor Achebe had been sick for some time.
He was 82 years old

Kano Bomb Blast: MASSOB Threatens War Because Of The Incessant Killings Of Ndigbo.

MASSOB leader, Chief Ralph Uwazuruike who issued the warning while reacting to Monday bomb blast at a motor park in Kano stated that Ndigbo would be forced to defend themselves from the recent killings in various parts of the North.

Uwazurike noted that the Igbo had been pushed to the wall by the Boko Haram insurgency, adding that the people would be left with no other option than rise to the occasion to defend themselves.

He said: “I am ready to declare another civil war in this country if this killings and other senseless activities on Ndigbo continue like this because I know that it was this type of massacre that brought about the first civil war in Nigeria.”

“I am disappointed in our people, because when they were being slaughtered, I brought out buses to bring them home, but they refused to come home and keep living in the North.

“What I did was to safeguard their lives because their lives were in danger. But I want to warn President Goodluck Jonathan that there is limit to everything. Ndigbo can no longer continue to allow themselves to be senselessly killed in the North.

“We are not cowards because I believe that it was this type of senseless killings that prompted the civil war and we are aware of the consequences of the ongoing provocation, but I must warn, that Ndigbo are not cowards and will react if pushed to the walls because there is limit to everything,” he said.

Meanwhile, it was gathered that five luxury buses belonging to Gobison, Ezenwata and Chimezie transport companies were affected in the bomb blasts.

BREAKING NEWS: Female DPO, 7-yr-old Son Shot Dead In Kano

A female Police DPO and her 7-year-old son have been shot dead at Daurawa, Maiduguri Road in Kano.

Temi as she is known was killed at about 7.30am on Tuesday. She was going to drop her son off in school.

Although details of the assassination are unclear, LEADERSHIP gathered that mother and child were killed by unknown gunmen who rode in a tricycle (Keke Napep).

It was also gathered that her husband is a retired Police officer.

The police have sealed off the area.

U-P-D-A-T-E-!!! MY OGA AT THE TOP: Wife Protest At Channels TV.

The wife of the NSCDC Commandant that was ridiculed in the crazy “My Oga At The Top” video has been reported to have forced her way into Channels TV studio today to protest bitterly to the chairman of Channels on the damages the crazy video has caused his family.

She cried that her kids at school are been ridiculed everyday by their mates. On her part, her neighbours and fellow market women make jest of her everyday. She say that the worse of the issue is that her husband can’t sleep at night again because of the terrible embarrassment the video has caused him.

In fact she says the man cry every night and also, the so called Oga at the Top is even contemplating sacking or demoting the man because of the damages the video has caused NSCDC.
[Before this woman came back from the protest at Channels TV, Her Husband has received a call about his suspension].

We are appealing to the Chief Commandant of NSCDC who rescind his decision to sack or punish this man as a result of his interview at Channels TV. We are also appealing to the Lagos state Government to send social workers to this family to counsel them on how to deal with sad development.
It will be ashamed if we hear that any member of this heart broken family committed suicide as a result of this embarrassment.

The question here is, shouldn’t the media be responsible for this misfortune?

Pope Francis Becomes The 266th Head Of Roman Catholic Church

Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio takes name of Francis after accepting his election as 266th head of Roman Catholic church

The cardinals of the Roman Catholic church on Wednesday chose as their new pope a man from almost “the end of the world” – the first non-European to be elected for almost 1,300 years and the first-ever member of the Jesuit order.

Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the archbishop of Buenos Aires, becomes Pope Francis – the first pontiff to take that name – an early indication perhaps of a reign he hopes will be marked by inspirational preaching and evangelisation.

But the cardinals’ choice risked running into immediate controversy over the new pope’s role in Argentina’s troubled history. In his book, El Silencio, a prominent Argentinian journalist alleged that he connived in the abduction of two Jesuit priests by the military junta in the so-called “dirty war”. He denies the accusation.

The new pope appeared on the balcony over the entrance to St Peter’s basilica more than an hour after white smoke poured from the chimney above the Sistine Chapel, signalling that the cardinals had made their choice. Dressed in his new white robes, the bespectacled Argentinian prelate looked pensive and perhaps a little intimidated as he looked out at the sea of jubilant humanity in the square.

The former Cardinal Bergoglio was not among the front-runners. But he obtained more votes than any other candidate except former pope Benedict in the 2005 conclave, and – although his election came as a surprise – he was certainly not a rank outsider.

According to some accounts, he was not chosen eight years ago because he begged his fellow cardinals not to continue voting for him. As he uttered his first words – “buona sera” – and the cheering died away, he told the crowd that his peers had been tasked with finding a bishop of Rome. “And it seems that they went almost to the end of the world to find him. But we’re here,” he said with a smile.

After a prayer for his predecessor, Benedict XVI, the new pope invited the faithful in the square to “pray for the entire world”. He added: “I hope that this path for the church will be one fruitful for evangelisation.”

Faced with a sharp choice between those cardinals who wanted a thorough shake-up of the Vatican and those who did not, it appeared the electors in the Sistine Chapel opted for compromise. Bergoglio has a reputation for both political canniness and reforming drive. Among the tests facing the 76-year-old will be the awesome managerial demands of the job.

The fumata bianca – the white smoke signal that marks the successful conclusion of a conclave – arrived after five ballots at the end of the second day of voting. The smoke that poured out of the comignolo, the copper and steel tube on the roof of the Sistine Chapel, was greeted with cries of delight and applause from the crowd below. Soon after, the bells of St Peter’s rang out, confirming that a new pope had taken over the spiritual leadership of the world’s 1.2 billion baptised Catholics.

Inside the Sistine Chapel after the final vote was cast, the most junior of the cardinals, James Harvey, a former prefect of the papal household, called in the secretary of the college of cardinals, Monsignor Lorenzo Baldisseri, and the master of papal liturgical ceremonies, Monsignor Guido Marini, to witness the new pope’s acceptance of one of the most daunting jobs on Earth.

The most senior of the electors, Cardinal Giovanni Battista Re, approached the pope-to-be and – in accordance with tradition – asked him in Latin: “Do you accept your canonical election as supreme pontiff?”

Having obtained his consent, he will have asked: “By what name do you wish to be called?” The master of ceremonies, acting as a notary, will then have summoned two of his staff to act as witnesses, and prepared the document that certifies the new pope’s acceptance.

Newly elected popes are taken to be robed in the Room of Tears, its name an indication of the reluctance with which most approach the task. The last holder of the office, Benedict XVI, introduced a change in the ritual that allows the new pope to pray before he is announced to the world.

Benedict abdicated on 28 February, saying that he was no longer able to cope with the burden of his office. He was the first pontiff to resign voluntarily since Celestine V in 1294.The world’s Catholics will be looking to his successor to provide not only spiritual inspiration but also firm leadership. The new pope was chosen against a background of turbulence and strife unprecedented in modern times. He takes on the leadership of a church whose faithful have been shocked by a proliferation of clerical sex abuse scandals throughout the rich world and dismayed by events in and around the Vatican.

The day for the 115 cardinal-electors began at about 6.30am local time in the Casa Santa Marta, their simple but comfortable – and highly protected – residence in the walled city state. After breakfast, they made their way to the Apostolic Palace, the home of the popes, for morning mass in the Pauline Chapel. By about 9.30am, they had settled themselves into the Sistine Chapel for prayers and the resumption of voting.

Benedict’s startling decision to resign came after years of mounting tension and discreet but venomous infighting in the Roman Curia, the central administration of the Catholic church. Last year, some of the pope’s correspondence, pointing to bitter rivalries and maladministration – or worse – in the Vatican was published in book form.

Benedict’s butler, Paolo Gabriele, was tried and imprisoned for leaking the documents, but the journalist to whom the papers were passed has said that his source was part of a much broader network of disaffected Vatican employees and officials. Gabriele’s arrest coincided with a renewed controversy over the Vatican bank, whose chairman was summarily dismissed last May.

The scandals – and a string of controversies over the pope’s own declarations – distracted attention from what was expected to be the central theme of his papacy. Benedict came to the leadership of the Catholic church as the pope who would begin the process of re-evangelising an increasingly secular western world.

That too will be an important challenge for his successor. In the approach to the conclave several cardinals said they wanted a great pastor for the world’s biggest Christian denomination.

No indication of how or why the new pope was chosen was expected to emerge. On Tuesday, before the start of the conclave, the cardinal-electors took an oath of secrecy, as had those Vatican employees and officials involved in the election.

Additional precautions included a sweep of the Sistine Chapel to ensure that no listening devices had been planted inside and the use of electronic jamming techniques.

New Pope Elected After Two Days Of Conclave

The Roman Catholic church has a new pope. White smoke flowed from the chimney above the Sistine chapel in the Vatican shortly after 6pm on Wednesday, signalling that one of the candidates for the pontificate had obtained the necessary two-thirds majority for election.

Cardinals elected Jorge Bergoglio of Buenos Aires, Argentina as Pope Francis I on Wednesday to lead the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics, overcoming deep divisions to select the 266th pontiff in a remarkably fast conclave.

As is customary, the identity of the new pope was not immediately made known. And the crowd in St Peter’s Square was waiting expectantly for him to appear on the huge balcony that runs across the front of St Peter’s basilica.

The fumata bianca – the white smoke signal that marks the successful conclusion of a papal conclave – arrived after five ballots on the second day of voting. The smoke that poured out of the comignolo, the copper and steel chimney on the roof of the Sistine Chapel, was greeted with cries of delight and applause from the crowd below.

Soon afterwards, the bells of St Peter’s rang out, confirming that a new pope had taken over the spiritual leadership of the world’s 1.2 billion baptised Catholics.

Inside the Sistine Chapel, after the final vote was cast, the most junior of the cardinals, James Harvey, a former prefect of the papal household, called in the secretary of the college of cardinals, Monsignor Lorenzo Baldisseri, and the master of papal liturgical ceremonies, Monsignor Guido Marini, to witness the new pope’s acceptance of one of the most daunting jobs on earth. The most senior of the electors, Cardinal Giovanni Battista Re, approached the pope-to-be and – in accordance with time-honoured tradition – asked him, in Latin: “Do you accept your canonical election as supreme pontiff?”

Having obtained his consent, he will have asked him: “By what name do you wish to be called?” The master of ceremonies, acting as a notary, will then have summoned two of his staff to act as witnesses, and prepared the document that certifies the new pope’s acceptance.

Newly elected popes are taken to be robed in the so-called Room of Tears, its name an indication of the reluctance with which most approach the task for which they have been chosen. The last holder of the office, Benedict XVI, introduced a change into the ritual that allows for the new pope to pray before he is announced to the world.

Benedict abdicated on 28 February, saying that he was no longer able to cope with the burden of his office. He was the first pontiff to resign voluntarily since Celestine V in 1294.

The world’s Catholics will be looking to his successor to provide not only spiritual inspiration but also firm leadership. The new pope was chosen against a background of turbulence and strife unprecedented in modern times. He takes on the leadership of a church whose faithful have been shocked by a proliferation of clerical sex abuse scandals throughout the rich world and dismayed by events in and around the Vatican.

The day for the 115 cardinal-electors began at about 6.30am local time in the Casa Santa Marta, their simple but comfortable – and highly protected – residence in the walled city state. After breakfast, they made their way to the Apostolic Palace, the home of the popes, for morning mass in the Pauline Chapel. By about 9.30am, they had settled themselves into the Sistine Chapel for prayers and the resumption of voting.

Benedict’s startling decision to resign came after years of mounting tension and discreet but venomous infighting in the Roman Curia, the central administration of the Catholic church. Last year, some of the pope’s correspondence, pointing to bitter rivalries and maladministration – or worse – in the Vatican was published in book form.

Benedict’s butler, Paolo Gabriele, was tried and imprisoned for leaking the documents, but the journalist to whom the papers were passed has said that his source was part of a much broader network of disaffected Vatican employees and officials. Gabriele’s arrest coincided with a renewed controversy over the Vatican bank, whose chairman was summarily dismissed last May.

The scandals – and a string of controversies over the pope’s own declarations – distracted attention from what was expected to be the central theme of his papacy. Benedict came to the leadership of the Catholic church as the pope who would begin the process of re-evangelising an increasingly secular western world.

That too will be an important challenge for his successor. In the approach to the conclave several cardinals said they wanted a great pastor for the world’s biggest Christian denomination.

No indication of how or why the new pope was chosen was expected to emerge. On Tuesday, before the start of the conclave, the cardinal-electors took an oath of secrecy, as had those Vatican employees and officials involved in the election.

Additional precautions included a sweep of the Sistine Chapel to ensure that no listening devices had been planted inside and the use of electronic jamming techniques.

Kano: Gunmen Shoot Three Primary School Teachers

Unidentified gunmen Tuesday morning attacked a primary school in Kano State and shot three teachers, including the headmaster.

The incident took place at the Danmaliki Primary School situated in Kumbotso Local Government of the state.

The teachers are currently receiving treatment.

Police authorities in the state have confirmed the attack