EVENT: FESTIVAL OF DESTINY 2014. THEME: “BORN TO MANIFEST” BY RCCG COURT OF HIS MAJESTY.

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RCCG Court of His Majesty Zone presents FESTIVAL OF DESTINY 2014 themed “BORN TO MANIFEST” starting on the 9th -16th November, 2014.

The Conference Opens with a Morning Session on Sunday 9th of November by 8am and continues in the evening by 6pm. (See Session Poster for my details on the various sessions)

The Conference hosted by Pastor Fred Odekhian, Pastor in Charge of RCCG Court of His Majesty Zone, will also have the following Ministers:

DR MENSA OTABIL (INTERNATIONAL CENTRAL GOSPEL CHURCH, ACCRA, GHANA)

BISHOP WAYNE MALCOLM (ICAN MINISTRIES, LONDON, UK)

DR ABEL DAMINA (POWER CITY INTERNATONAL CHURCH, UYO, NIGERIA)

PASTOR PETER AMENKHIENAN (SATGO/EAST AFRICAN REGIONAL OVERSEER, RCCG)

PASTOR FEMI ATOYEBI [SAN] (PASTOR-IN-CHARGE OF RCCG REGION 19)

Venue: RCCG COURT OF HIS MAJESTY ZONE, ABESAN ESTATE GATE, IPAJA, LAGOS.

DATE:9TH16TH NOVEMBER 2014.

 

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Plan to Attend.

Radio Livestream on www.amenradio.net

You don’t have to miss a session.

RCCG General Overseer, Pastor Adeboye Has A Message For Christians About Elections 2015

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General Overseer of the Redeemed Christian Church of God, RCCG, Pastor Enoch Adeboye, and the National President of Christian Association of Nigeria, CAN, Pastor Ayo Oritsejafor, have urged Christians and indeed all Nigerians to take advantage of the continuous voters registration, to acquire permanent voter’s card ahead of the 2015 polls.

Speaking at two different fora yesterday, the two eminent Christian clerics stressed the point that Christians must come out en masses next February to vote the candidate of their choice which, they argued, is their civic responsibility.

 

At this month’s Holy Ghost Service at the Redemption Camp on Lagos-Ibadan Expressway, Adeboye urged participants from different denominations to make sure they carry out their civic responsibility by registering for their voter’s’ card and also vote for candidate of their choice.

 

He told the mammoth crowd of worshipers including ministers of God to visit the nearest local government to them for the registration exercise, sounding a note of warning to members of the church that voter’s card will be checked on the first Sunday of December.

 

 

Daughter of Imprisoned Chinese Pastor Detained by Authorities

 

Zhang Shanshan, the daughter of imprisoned pastor Zhang Shaojie, has reportedly been detained by Chinese authorities; it is believed that Zhang Shanshan is being held in a hotel against her will.
Pastor Zhang was arrested in November 2013 for allegedly gathering a crowd which disrupted public order and committing fraud. He was sentenced to 12 years in prison in July at a trial that was not announced to his lawyers; American officials have called for his release.
Zhang’s daughter was reportedly taken into custody on Wednesday (Nov. 5) by unidentified men. A text that Zhang Shanshan sent her husband Hua CheeChuan read, “Nanle Hotel, help me!”
Hua believes Zhang Shanshan was detained to prevent her from speaking about her father’s wrongful imprisonment.
“They try to cover up the ugly things in the country, and they don’t want the outside world to know what is going on in China,” he said.
“So I think that’s why they’ve arrested them, and put them somewhere else.”

Don’t Forget the Nigerian Schoolgirls, or Girls’ Education – Christy Vines

 

While the world’s attention is firmly fixed on the Islamic State’s continued rein of terror, applause for Malala Yousafzai — for taking home the Nobel Peace Prize — has taken on a quieter tone. Yet, her message — that girls can turn the tide against religious radicalism and repression — risks being lost.
In another part of the world, reports continue to trickle in of the failed negotiations between the Nigerian government and Boko Haram — negotiations that were supposed to include provisions for release of the more than 200 Nigerian schoolgirls who remain firmly within Boko Haram’s grip.
In fact, there are new reports that another 20 to 70 women and girls have become the latest victims of Boko Haram’s terror, threatening the cease-fire that was to bring the original schoolgirls home. Moreover, much of the world is now eerily silent on the subject — calling into question the commitment to the return of the girls and undermining the separate campaign to improve the education of girls worldwide.
Is this Malala’s world? One where the value of female lives is an open question, and where the kidnapping of girls and women by terrorists goes unanswered? It certainly seems that way. The ?bringbackourgirls campaign championed by first lady Michelle Obama and countless Hollywood stars is now a stagnant memory.
Compare this reality to the global push to educate the girls, an understood foundation for economic development and prosperity, with the paradox of the wholesale abandonment of the abducted girls, whose only crime was receiving this exact education.
Despite the U.S.-led coalition’s ongoing military campaign against the Islamic State, its fight for gender rights and the education of girls will take more than F-18s and good intentions. The education of girls cannot be dropped from the sky, and it cannot be a drive-by celebrity cause. It will take protracted American engagement, the kind that brings pressure on Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan and the kind that shifts global interests toward the long-term game of security, of gender rights and education, that makes development possible.
Boko Haram is as much a threat to the women and girls of Nigeria as the Islamic State is to these same people in Iraq and Syria. And neither the U.S. nor the world can afford to allow one terrorist group to go unchecked while (essentially) waging war on another.
Nigeria has become the economic epicenter and largest populace of West Africa, and indeed of the whole sub-Saharan region. The time for the U.S. to act together with the world to rescue the Nigerian schoolgirls (and those recently abducted) is now, when the world is watching, and when its commitment not only to combating terror, but to the rights of girls, and their futures, hangs in the balance.
A renewed, coordinated effort by world leaders will signal their continued commitment as much to the release and return of the Nigerian girls as to the value of girls everywhere. It will speak loudly to the 51 percent of the world’s population that their futures are not risked by the latest global crisis — whether that crisis is Ebola in West Africa or terrorist attacks at home. Failure in this area will have a long-term and catastrophic impact on the trust of girls worldwide in promises made.
With much of the world riveted on the atrocities occurring almost daily in the Middle East, we must not forget that intertwined in our efforts to rid the world of radical terrorists are people — in particular those most vulnerable to their activities and atrocities. We must remember what we are fighting radical terror for. The fate of that fight, and of the Chibok schoolgirls, may yet prove one and the same.
(Christy Vines is executive director of the Center for Women, Faith & Leadership at the Institute for Global Engagement.)