From Dunghill To Balling! Get Inspired By Same OG’s Story Ahead Of August 10 Release!

Christian Hip Hop artiste Same OG has kept mum about the focus of her August 10 release, nevertheless, there has been a lot of buzz about the artiste in the past days and we took some time to put the spotlight on Same OG.

After the video for her single “I Ball”, not much has been heard from her, as per music, but the impact of “I Ball” was big enough to sustain her, till the big announcement of the yet-to-be-known release.

Same OG is synonymous with excellence, this can be seen in her production, her brand and her mode of delivery. From the get-go, she has set herself aside for greatness. As her sound blares through the airwaves, it is impossible she bypasses you unnoticed.

It wasn’t all blue skies and sunshine for the baller however. Same OG was lifted from the dunghill, so she can lift others. She has known some grey days coming up. She chronicles her journey on her official website grafting her pain and passion vividly. You would grasp her persona and purpose before the vocabulary is conjured in your mind.


Losing her dad to cancer, and her mom, in a short space was a blow no one can be well prepared for. Kicked to the streets and separated from the rest of her family by circumstance, Same OG tried hard to grope out of the dark, buffeted by hunger and suicidal thoughts, she stuck to her passion and it eventually made a way.

Being a scriptwriter and content officer for the online platforms of a firm in Lagos was a breath of fresh air. With the rest of her family attended, she scuttled her way back to her first love – music.

While speaking with SelahAfrik‘s Alex Amos, she attested that music was one of the reasons she was able to pull through the periods of ordeal.

“I had to even do corporate begging”, she chuckled ruefully. “Through those times, music was what kept me going.”

Aside the critically acclaimed single “I Ball”, other songs by Same OG includes, “Give it All”, featuring New-School rapper Limoblaze“Carry Me Dey Go” and “I Believe”, featuring Soul. The single “I Ball” has a beautiful lyrics video and official video complimenting the wave making release.

Expect Same OG’s newest release August 10, 2017.

“DEATH AT TWO” by Nuhu Moses

Do not strut; give a doubt and patiently go thro’ this deep poem from Moses. Here, the meaning of his poem is ironical to its title. Do not be confused. Read through:

Alive and young,

Old and dead


Again, alive and ever young,

Not growing old


We live, one, ten, hundred

We grow old


Young, we die young

Happily young


We die at two

Age, we do not by years

Age, we do by abilities, inabilities


We were two years, able

We are two years, unable


We ran on two

We shiveringly walk on three

We die at two

Death at two

Thoughts of a great evangelical – Poju Oyemade 

​Thoughts of a great Evangelical.

“Once we begin to reckon (appropriate) identification truths, some of us make the mistake of trying to straighten out our pastor and the church along those lines. But our testimony must first be observed by others and then heard. 

The Spirit will have us prayerfully watch for the hungry heart, feeding the few in preference to offending the many. 

Furthermore, those around us have a right to observe over a period of time whether or not our witness and our walk are valid”

1 Timothy 4:16 Take heed unto thyself, and unto the doctrine; continue in them: for in doing this thou shalt both save thyself, and them that hear thee.

1 Timothy 4:15Meditate upon these things; give thyself wholly to them; that thy profiting may appear to all.

“WHEN I WAS YOUR AGE” -By Nuhu Moses

Again!  Moses presents you with a narrative poem that reiterates the place of integrity in various aspects. He indirectly heralds our core values as Africans by painting an imagery of a ‘father-son’ kinda interaction that happens from generations to another. Here: 
Those days

Times when every truth sold

When honesty was truly the best policy

Times our philadelphia was high

Now, all is not

For all happened

When i was your age


Those evenings we sat

At granny’s feet we listened

Stories of our heritage

We wanted to know who we really are

Now, all is not

All happened

But when i was your age


Times, seasons

Every penny, with contentment spent

Worth our sweat

Not inferior, not superior, every fellow

Nobody was a nobody

Not the same today

Those happened

But when i was your age


All days gone

Betrothed by parents, we grew

Friends without had we

valued priceless and high

Virginity

Now different

As all happened

When i was your age


Daddy’s words

Now, what life was

He was my age

Great those times

I smelt, i imagined

Dad was my age, older

Tomorrow, i will tell Little

What life is

When i become dad’s age today.

“WHAT IF…” by Nuhu Moses


​Moses in “What if” expresses his hope of an unadulterated and all-encompassing relationship. Assumption is the palate with which the perfect picture is painted in this piece.  Here:

               WHAT IF… 

What if you are mine?

Friend, what if your soul be

Knitted to mine? 


Shall we be absent?

We hunger for love.

Shall we not be alive to the heart?


We feel

What nature gives;

We always want; positive, negative.

Caged. Nature bars us.


My heart, my pocket, my time

Yours.

Our turn. Now, our time.


We are here

You are there

We are together.


We love you

What if you are mine?

What if these are true?

What if…?

Olowogbogboro: How the apostles broke through into the mind of the Gentiles – Poju Oyemade 

Olowogbogboro: How the apostles broke through into the mind of the Gentiles by Poju Oyemade 
As the apostles went out into the Gentile world to preach the gospel, they obviously came across a certain challenge. It was easy to tell the Jew about the coming Messiah and to use types and shadows in the old covenant and tabernacles with other historical events in Scripture to show that Jesus Christ who came in flesh was the Messiah and the true Saviour.
You could teach on why the law was given, Mount Sinai, the High Priest etc but not to the Gentiles who had no such concepts in their background. They knew nothing about Sinai nor Zion. They had no Scriptural background.
How then were they to preach Jesus? There must be a way around this they must have thought. Then they saw it. God is omnipresent and if so, His presence must be recognizable in the cultures of the people.
Paul said it this way in Acts 17:26-28 (KJV)

“And hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth, and hath determined the times before appointed, and the bounds of their habitation; That they should seek the Lord, if haply they might feel after him, and find him, though he be not far from every one of us: For in him we live, and move, and have our being; as certain also of your own poets have said, For we are also his offspring”- even their poetry spoke to this.
There must be a way through which the people who felt His presence tried to reach Him. They knew if they looked into their cultures they will find God’s presence and they could preach from there.
Paul clearly saw it. In Acts 17:22-24 (KJV) it says

“Then Paul stood in the midst of Mars’ hill, and said, Ye men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious.

For as I passed by, and beheld your devotions, I found an altar with this inscription, To The Unknown God. Whom therefore ye ignorantly worship, him declare I unto you”
satan had clearly exploited the ignorance of the people to turned the people into idolatry.
Paul further explained to the Romans that even though the Law wasn’t given to the Gentiles, if you went into their midst you would find the presence of God witnessing in their consciences the same things the Law said.
Romans 2:14-15 (KJV)

“For when the Gentiles, which have not the law, do by nature the things contained in the law, these, having not the law, are a law unto themselves: Which shew the work of the law written in their hearts, their conscience also bearing witness, and their thoughts the mean while accusing or else excusing one another;)”
Prof William Barclay, a man of Scottish origin and one of the finest theologians who has a version of new testament in print due to his vast knowledge in Greek had this to say about how John came to use the word Logos to define Jesus to the Gentile world. 

I quote
“By the end of the first century the Christian Church was faced with an acute problem in communication. The Church had been cradled in Judaism, but now she had to present her message to a Greek world, to which the categories of Judaism were quite alien. As Goodspeed puts it: ‘A Greek who felt like becoming a Christian was called upon to accept Jesus as the Christ, the Messiah.
He would naturally ask what this meant, and would have to be given a short course in Jewish apocalyptic thought. Was there no way in which he might be introduced directly to the values of Christian civilization without being for ever routed, we might even say detoured, through Judaism? Must Christianity always speak in a Jewish vocabulary?’
Round about A.D 70 there was a man in Ephesus called John who saw this problem. He was perhaps the greatest mind in the Christian Church; and suddenly he saw the solution. Both Jew and Greek possessed the conception of the logos of God. Could the two ideas not be brought together?

Let us see the Greek background with which John had to work. 
(i) Away back in 560 B.C there was a Greek philosopher called Heracleitus, who also lived in Ephesus. He conceived of the world as what he called a flux. Everything is in a state of change; there is nothing static in the world. But if everything is changing all the time, why is the world not an absolute and complete chaos? His answer was that ‘all things happen according to the logos’.
In the world there is a reason and a mind at work; that mind is the mind of God, God’s logos; and it is that logos which makes the world an ordered cosmos and not a disordered chaos. (ii) This idea of a mind, a reason, a logos ruling the world fascinated the Greeks. Anaxagoras spoke of the mind (nous) which ‘rules over all things’.
Plato declared that it was God’s logos which kept the planets in their courses, and brought back the seasons and the years in their appointed times.
But it was the Stoics, who were at their strongest when the NT was being written, who passionately loved this conception. To them this logos of God, as Cleanthes said, ‘roamed through all things’. The times, the seasons, the tides, the stars in their courses were ordered by the logos; it was the logos which put sense into the world.
Further, the mind of man himself was a little portion of this logos. ‘Reason is nothing else than a part of the divine spirit immersed in the human body,’ said Seneca. It was the logos which put sense into the universe and sense into man; and this logos was nothing other than the mind of God.
(iii) This conception was brought to its highest peak by Philo, who was an Alexandrian Jew, and who had the aim of joining together in one synthesis the highest thought of Jew and Greek. To him the logos of God was ‘inscribed and engraved upon the constitution of all things’. The logos is ‘the tiller by which the pilot of the universe steers all things’. ‘Every man is akin in understanding to the divine logos.’ ‘The logos is the high priest which sets the soul before God.’ The logos is the bridge between man and God.
Now we can see what John was doing when he uttered his tremendous statement, ‘The Word was made flesh.’ (i) He was clothing Christianity in a dress that a Greek could understand.
Here is a challenge to us. He refused to go on expressing Christianity in outworn and Judaistic categories. He used categories that his age knew and understood.
Again and again the Church has failed in that task through mental laziness, through shrinking from possible heresy; but the man who would discover a new continent must accept the hazard of sailing upon an uncharted sea.”- end of quote
Next time people ask you who is this Olowogbogboro you worship? simply reply thus He said
“Go your way, and tell John what things ye have seen and heard; how that the blind see, the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed, the deaf hear, the dead are raised, to the poor the gospel is preached. And blessed is he, whosoever shall not be offended in me”

My Early Start as a Rapper/Singer and a Life Lesson from it for our Generation(s) 

Many people that know me today find it hard to picture me as a rapper. 

But yeah, I was a rapper and got on stage to rap in front of crowds and my last live show was in my 2nd year in the university at the Miss UNN pageant. It was my first time rapping on stage in UNN and it was my last too.

But hey, right before then, I used to be a singer way back in secondary school (Science College). I had a boy band and we were the FLAME in our school…Oh well, we were actually known as FLAME (a.k.a Outlawz for Christ).

Okay, go ahead…laugh.

Yup. I and my friends came together and we formed that group. Almost every Sunday, we would get on stage in our school’s chapel and sing different songs, including Acapellas. We were tired of having boring chapel services and thought of how to spice things up so we and other students don’t die of boredom.

Every time we got on stage, the girls/guys used to be thrilled. You could literarily see people run out from the bush and other places they hid to ‘dodge’ evening chapel and into the hall whenever we got on stage and shouts rent the air.

People looked forward to coming to the chapel expecting us to sing. The once ‘so boring’ evening chapel became a ‘goer’ for students because we made it lit anytime we got on stage and because we never announced if we’d be on stage at any service, students showed up almost every other Sunday hoping we would get on stage.

Right as we shone on, a group of junior students came together and tried to do what we used to do and were bent on doing it ‘better’ than us. My group saw it as competition but I told them I was glad we had inspired others to join in making the Sunday evenings lit and that they’d help us keep the chapel charged when we weren’t performing.

We gave them the spot and they were the ones on stage for a while. Then, on the last Sunday before our graduation, they had planned for it to be their biggest performance but they had issues during their performance because some were trying too hard to outshine others and they ended up making a mess out of the whole thing.

I looked at my guys and told them we had to go up there. We nodded…we grouped up outside…sent word to the chapel prefect and he excitedly ran and announced that FLAME would be on stage that evening. The chapel went up in flame (pun intended) as students screamed in excitement.

We got on stage, sang and then switched to rap and yes, the place burned down (Figuratively). Screams everywhere. The whole place was something else and people actually ran and followed us when we left the stage.

After this, the younger guys met me and one of them that was close to me confessed that they had grouped up to replace us. That they had wanted to outshine us and make us irrelevant because most of his class mates felt we were ‘doing’ too much.

You see, that is the problem right there. I and my group got on stage to drive away boredom from school and make people look forward to evening chapel but these young guys actually grouped just to drive us off stage and become the ‘superstars’.

This is the conflict amongst and between generations today. Most people in the younger generation usually try to replace their peers and even those older in the profession without understanding that the original purpose of doing what is done is to better society, not to be seen as the ‘best superstars that ever liveth’.

Many of them expend their energy trying to ‘overtake’ those they should be meeting up to be mentored by or shown the light as well as those they should be ‘collaborating with’ to do better. Many run with slogans like ‘takeover’ and the rest and even pray in church asking for grace to take over and outshine others.

They miss it.

We are called to a noble cause. Whatever we do here on earth should be to better life here. Life is not a rappers’ beef/dis track. Life is more like a duet or group song with each person on it aiming to thrill the listener, not compete with the others.

We miss it when we see others as competition and expend our energy and existence on trying to outshine them or take their spot. That mentality is so much a goner.

Reach out and work with people in your field of pursuit or endeavor. We are not at war. We are all in this life together. Young people, work with each other and even an older colleague. Older people, bring the younger guys in on what you do.

Philip Asuquotes with some of his protege(s) at PAQ SESSION


Most of the professions you see today were actually started by noble men for a noble cause that would help humanity. Many young people come up and without knowing the right reins about their profession, they fly into practice with a vow to beat the others and be the best…as if that was the reason that profession was ever set up.

Let the baton of nobility be passed from generation to generation.

Let us actually know and do what we are here to do, without the faulty mentality of ‘taking over’ or outshining the other. Life is about succession. Let the noble teach the newbies and let them in turn show their peers the noble way to life on earth.



ABOUT THE WRITER

Philip Asuquotes is a strategy consultant, poimen and futurist. He studied Mass Communication in the University of Nigeria Nsukka and has been active in the sphere of branding and public relations. He is the convener of PAQ SESSION, a live intellectual and thought leadership summit. He can be reached via philipasuquotes@gmail.com or @philasuquotes on Twitter | www.thebloomsquare.com

EXEMPLARY LIVING BY PASTOR STEVE SOYEBO

We are in a season where there seem to be a scarcity of the word of God, but then again, we know God always has His remnants whose task is to keep teaching and preaching the true word of God. This message you are about to listen to is titled exemplary living by pastor Steve .

Pastor Steve Soyebo is the Senior Pastor at House on the Word Church, which is a non-denominational, multi-cultural church in the city of Houston. “Bishop”, as he is fondly called, is known for his servant heart, compassionate acts and leadership skills. Through the help of the Holy Spirit, he carries a clear message of empowerment, hope, healing and transformation. He is widely regarded as a visionary leader and bridge-builder.

Pastor Steve is passionate about helping people around him develop to their fullest potential. His experience in the real estate business, traveling and speaking internationally has helped shape his commitment to showcasing a ministry where people of all racial and ethnic groups worship God in a loving and caring atmosphere

Should Pastors Run for Political Office? – Bethany Blankley

In his 1958 book, Stride Toward Freedom, Martin Luther King, Jr. argued that pastors must play a critical role in politics. While pastoring the Montgomery Alabama Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, he wrote,

“The important thing is for every minister to dedicate himself to the Christian ideal of brotherhood, and be sure he is doing something positive to implement it.

“He must never allow the theory that it is better to remain quiet and help the cause to become a rationalization for doing nothing. Many ministers can do much more than they are doing and still hold their congregations.”

Similarly, in January, 2015, David Lane, the founding director of the American Renewal Project organized a movement to encourage 100,000 pastors, their friends, family members, and congregants to consider becoming more involved in their communities, and in particular, to consider running for political office.

One of his primary goals was to equip 1,000 pastors to run for office in 2016– either for city council, school board, county commissioner, mayor, or state legislator. But, pastors, after learning about the process from attending the American Renewal Project’s Issachar Training events, began encouraging their congregants, friends, and family members to run for office.

Lane estimates that “by simple arithmetic, if the Lord called 1,000 pastors to run in 2016 and if they averaged 300 volunteers per campaign, then that would mean 300,000 ground-level Evangelicals working within their local precincts. When my own pastor, Rob McCoy, ran for office, he saw 625 volunteers join in his campaign. A similar grassroots, Evangelical movement—from coast-to-coast—would change America for good.”

“No one I know is under the illusion that politicians are going to save America,” he repeatedly says. But, because “virtue is a key component of freedom,” it is necessary for “spiritual men and women … to bring wisdom and righteousness to every area of society.”

Naysayers may criticize Lane and others for attempting to “create a theocracy.” But it’s important to recognize that a theocracy, and whatever that supposedly means, isn’t even realistic. And, genuine Christians recognize that a “theocracy” is not even remotely close to the purpose of Christianity.

More importantly — it is because of Christians — that America is not a “theocracy.”

(The Puritans tried, but failed quite miserably, evidencing that most Christians cannot agree on what theological interpretation should govern, if it should govern at all.)

What most may not realize and take for granted is that pastors– more than anyone else–are best equipped to meet and suggest solutions for societal problems.

Why? Because they are already on the front lines of every societal problem– from beginning to end of life. Pastors are the ones teaching about healthy marriages, relationships, and family development– officiating marriages and blessing births. They are already supervising the oversight of educational initiatives, Christian schools, homeschool and community activities, acutely aware of children’s needs. They’re pro-life beyond protests– they adopt and are foster parents.

Pastors are already counseling grieving, hurt, and broken people. They speak at funerals and spend time with prisoners– even on death row. They, better than anyone else, know firsthand the needs, struggles, and dreams of their congregants and neighbors– average Americans who struggle and celebrate every stage of life.

Also taken for granted, and not well known, is the reality that pastors and their wives are involved in perhaps the most stressful and discouraging profession of all. The majority lead small churches, struggle financially, receive death threats, and in no way compare to the mega-churches advertised on television. According to nearly 20 years of research compiled by several ministry research organizations, more than 70 percent of pastors– more than doctors, lawyers, or politicians– regularly consider leaving their profession because of stress and burn out. And 35-40 percent of pastors do give up within five years.

This initiative, even pastors who don’t run for office, encourages and reminds Christians of their rich heritage as Americans. Encouraging pastors to become involved in politics neither seeks to “reshape the face of America into a Christian evangelical one,” nor to create “Christian nationalism.”

Instead, the goal is to restore America’s Judeo-Christian heritage, a heritage that never previously existed in any government in history. purposed to define and safeguard individual liberties and freedoms. And– a call for pastors to return to their historical roots. Indeed, the Revolutionary War would not have happened were it not for pastors teaching and encouraging their neighbors.

The British recognized the most powerful force in the colonies was pastors, whom they called the Black Robe Regiment. Famed political philosopher, Alexis de Tocqueville, also pointed out that Christianity, more than anything else, was instrumental in defining American exceptionalism.

If pastors can encourage people to live in such a way that embraces fathers and intact families, prevents teen pregnancy, alleviates poverty, drug abuse and crime, squashes racism, and condones materialism and greed– wouldn’t that “make America great again?”

If a better alternative to the status quo exists for individuals, families, and societies, why not be open to it, even embrace it?

Bethany Blankley is the Senior Editor for Constitution.com. Her syndicated show, “America’s Betrayal,” can be heard on Conservative Review Radio, WAAR Radio, and other talk radio stations. Her columns have been published by The Washington Times, Newsday, Western Journalism, Townhall, The Christian Post, Charisma News, and others. She was a former communications strategist to four Senators, one Congressman, one New York governor, and several nonprofits. She holds graduate and undergraduate degrees in Theology and Political Science. Follow her: @bethanyblankley & http://www.bethanyblankley.com.