Chioma Okereke is set to release her new album titled, Deep Soul Rhythms

 

Chioma Okereke is set to release her new album titled, Deep Soul Rhythms; this is a sequel to the previous release of her second studio album in 2016.

The new album contains 12 tracks: Lock me in, Chineme nma, Love me, Rhythm of your love, Love in display, Ifunaya me (Remix), Miracles, The name of Jesus, Speaking tears, Great grace great power, Mommy Mo and Glory, and is slated for release on the 21st of July.

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Debbie Riches Is Out With A New Single “Blessed”

 

Debbie Riches is a versatile and anointed gospel music minister who debuted into the gospel Music Industry last year with the release of her maiden single “Most High”. She raises the standards with this new upbeat song title “Blessed”.
Blessed” is filled with positive professions towards our lives. We are blessed because God blessed us and there is no curse that can surpass this blessing. It goes further to give thanks to the Lord who blesses us with spiritual blessing. Get ready to be blessed by this song!

Why ‘Ordinary Time’ is Most Extraordinary for God’s Work – James Tonkowich

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During our New Years visit to see our son and his family, our grandson asked his mom if he could “open the door” when we got home from church. “Open the front door? Sure you can,” she replied. That’s not what he had in mind. He wanted to open “a little door” like the other little doors he opened in his Advent calendar. “Not till next year,” he was told.

 

Christmas is over and as a friend likes to say, “Ain’t nothin’ as over as Christmas.”

 

We waited again with Israel of old for the promised Messiah. We marveled at the angel’s announcement to Mary and held our breath until we heard her say, “Be it done to me according to your word,” assuring our salvation. We fretted with Joseph about what to do with pregnant Mary until he too heard the words of an angel. We went on the wearying journey from Nazareth to Bethlehem with Mary about to deliver only to hear, “No room at the inn” and plop down in the stable. We rejoiced at the birth of Jesus with the angels and shepherds and saw with Simeon the “light to give light to the Gentiles and the glory of… Israel.” We waited as the Magi made their way by the light of the star, worshipped the baby king, and went home by another way.

That is, we’ve relived the who, what, when, where, why, and how of our faith. (Or at least a big chunk of it. We’ll relive the rest from Lent to Pentecost.) Now we begin what liturgists call “Ordinary Time.”

 

The late Richard John Neuhaus objected to the phrase “Ordinary Time” since, he wrote, for the Christian “no time is ordinary.” And, while I agree at some level, on another level I believe (and I’m sure Fr. Neuhaus believed) that it is precisely in the midst of our ordinary that God works his extraordinary. That’s because it’s during Ordinary Time that we answer the question, “So what?” What difference do the facts of the incarnation, suffering, death, and resurrection of Jesus make in the ordinary, daily grind at home, in the office, at school, in the supermarket, at the airport, in the kitchen, at the gym?

 

Brother Lawrence (1614-1691) had an answer. He entered the monastery knowing that he hated kitchen work, but no one seems to have asked his opinion. When he received his work assignment, he found himself fixing meals and washing the pots and pans on permanent KP. Over time, the ordinary and endless cycle of meal preparation and clean up took on an extraordinary dimension. “The time of business,” he said in The Practice of the Presence of God, “does not with me differ from the time of prayer, and in the noise and clatter of my kitchen, while several persons are at the same time calling for different things, I possess God in as great tranquility as if I were upon my knees at the blessed sacrament,” that is, as if at worship.

 

2015 will, I believe, be a troubled and troubling year. Religious liberty will continue to be eroded by the press toward greater and greater sexual license and the accompanying demand for affirmation in our schools, corporations, public life, and even our churches. The murderous attack on employees of the magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris last week is a reminder that radical Islam is alive and well across the West as it is across the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. And the cyber attack and blackmail perpetrated on Sony last month make it clear that our hyper-connected, technological wonderland may be our worst nightmare. We live in a very dangerous world and many will willingly hand over freedom in exchange for hypothetical safety.

 

Confronted with this, I keep coming back to the words of Fr. George Rutler who wrote in his book A Crisis of Saints: The Call to Heroic Faith in an Unheroic World, “All I really have to say about this is that each turning point in history is a test of holiness, and the saints make the big difference in the world’s fortunes. As a corollary to this, since holiness is marked by heroic virtue, the real danger to society is not merely a lack of virtue, but lack of heroism.”

 

What can ordinary people do during ordinary time about the dangers before us? If the events of Christmas time and Easter time are true and we take God at his word and act by faith, the answer will be deeds that are extraordinary, even heroic.

 

 

Jim Tonkowich is a writer, commentator, and speaker focusing on the role of religion in our public life. His new book, The Liberty Threat: The Attack on Religious Freedom in America Today is available from St. Benedict Press and other online retailers.

Aaron T Aaron Is Set To Release New Single Titled “Glory Be To God”

Psalmist Aaron T Aaron announces that Glory Be To God will be a FREE DOWNLOAD from 1st September 2017 via AaronTAaron.com. This much-loved song is lifted from the forthcoming Album ‘ Right Here, Right Now ’, written by Aaron T Aaron & Noel Robinson, produced by Wole Oni.

Glory Be To God has already been well received by YouTube viewers the simple yet powerful lyrics stir praise to God and is guaranteed to have listeners dancing! The single is nothing less of high praise, containing a remix of English, Igbo and traditional African praise songs.  The video and single promises to be a milestone for African style Christian music in the UK.

Aaron T Aaron is a John Maxwell certified, Speaker, Coach, Trainer in addition to being a Singer, Songwriter, Worship Leader and Mentor. He ministers through various avenues to establish the kingdom of God here on earth and has taken phenomenal strides infusing African and western contemporary sounds in his music, with hit singles such as, ” Your Name Be Praised “, ” Thank You For Your Grace “, “ I Will Sing Of Your Praise “and ” Double Double “.

As an instrument of praise, Aaron seeks to and indeed proclaims the joy of the Gospel through zealous exhalations, praise and worship.

He released his first EP in June 2010 entitled ‘ Your Name Be Praised ’. Following this, on October 30th, 2010, Aaron released a worship album entitled ‘ Awesome God ’.

In August 2015 He also went on to release the critically acclaimed ‘ Here & Re al ’ which is graced with Gospel music heavyweights from around the world such as Lisa McClendon , Muyiwa Olarewaju , Elvis E , Donna Akodu , and Cobhams Asuquo .

In 2016 Aaron T Aaron collaborated with Mike Abdul singing ‘ I Will Sing of Your Praise ’, and this video went viral within the first 24 hours of release.

Aaron has praised his way to the top 10 of the UK’s Christian charts, won best UK praise and worship music video for JUMP Awards, shared stages with the likes of Charles Jenkins , Israel Houghton , Nat haniel Bassey , Don Moen , Matt Redman , Tim Hughes , Jonathan Butler and many more gospel greats.

In the meantime, Aaron has made significant strides in the reach of his ministry. He has toured Israel, Jamaica, America, South Africa, Spain, Germany, Nigeria, Netherlands, Canada and Ghana and also featured in the first BBC Proms: Gospel Edition at the Royal Albert Hall in London and performed at the Apollo London where he featured on “ How great is our God ” with Tim Hughes

Aaron aspires to create gospel music and lead worship across the globe with a rallying call for worshippers to come back to the place of worship. Being both Nigerian and British he has been able to bridge the cultural gaps with his fusion of Western and African influences, ensuring he can minister to people from all races and be a blessing to people reaching all over the world.

As his birth name declares “to praise God”, in exuberance, Aaron T Aaron continuously leaps to greater heights fulfilling his God-given purpose.

He is a husband to Annabel, A father, spiritual father to many, mentor under great mentors, a leader under amazing leadership, a brother and a ‘make it happen’ friend to many but most of all, a willing servant to a sensational God.

Glory Be To God can be downloaded from 8am GMT on Friday 1st September 2017.

Watch the live performance with Aaron T Aaron & Sound Of Praise ft. Noel Robinson:



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Official Countdown to What Same OG is Unveiling This August

Same OG is dropping a FULL BODY OF MUSIC. It is her Debut project as she has initially dropped singles which has earned lot of good comments via tangible dissemination.
Being the first body of work, Same OG who is a young independent female artist shows some versatility, passion and ultimately wants to make a huge impact hence putting up a campaign structure to make this work well known.

The aim of this campaign is to take Same OG and her songs on this project to the END OF THE WORLD. #Amen.

We intend to dominate the entire Social Media, Online properties (website and apps), BBM, WhatsApp, Third Party affiliation/associations, Radio interviews, TV interviews, etc.

So you are enjoined to be on the lookout as Same OG would be right in your face.

Here’s a video preview for a tip of what to expect:

5 Ways the Prosperity Gospel Is Hurting Africa – J Lee Grady

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I’m not an African, but in 2008 some Nigerian friends gave me a Yoruba name (“Akinwale”) because I have been to that country so often. My visits there, along with trips to Uganda, Kenya, Malawi, South Africa and Egypt, planted a deep love for Africa in my heart. My first grandson’s arrival this year from Ethiopia made the connection even stronger.

I’m often asked to describe how God is moving in Africa today. Since I’m an optimist, I usually tell of the large churches, the passionate praise and the intense spiritual hunger that characterizes African Christianity. But there is also a dark side, and I think it’s time we addressed one of the most serious threats to faith on the continent.

I’m talking about the prosperity gospel. Of course, I know a slick version of this message is preached in the United States—and I know we are the ones who exported it overseas. I am not minimizing the damage that prosperity preaching has done in my own country. But I have witnessed how some African Christians are taking this money-focused message to new and even more dangerous extremes.

Here are five reasons the prosperity message is damaging the continent of Africa today:

1. It is mixed with occultism. Before Christianity came to Nigeria, people visited witch doctors and sacrificed goats or cows to get prosperity. They poured libations on the ground so the gods would hear their prayers. Today similar practices continue, only the juju priest has been replaced by a pastor who drives a Mercedes-Benz. I am aware of a pastor who buried a live animal under the floor of his church to win God’s favor. Another pastor asked his congregants to bring bottles of sand to church so he could anoint them; he then told the people to sprinkle the sand in their houses to bring blessings. The people who follow these charlatans are reminded that their promised windfall won’t materialize unless they give large donations.

2. It fuels greed. Any person who knows Christ will learn the joy of giving to others. But the prosperity gospel teaches people to focus on getting, not giving. At its core it is a selfish and materialistic faith with a thin Christian veneer. Church members are continually urged to sow financial seeds to reap bigger and bigger rewards. In Africa, entire conferences are dedicated to collecting offerings in order to achieve wealth. Preachers boast about how much they paid for suits, shoes, necklaces and watches. They tell their followers that spirituality is measured by whether they have a big house or a first-class ticket. When greed is preached from the pulpit, it spreads like a cancer in God’s house.

3. It feeds pride. This greedy atmosphere in prosperity churches has produced a warped style of leadership. My Kenyan friend Gideon Thuranira, editor of Christian Professional magazine, calls these men “churchpreneurs.” They plant churches not because they have a burden to reach lost souls but because they see dollar signs when they fill an auditorium with chairs. A selfish message produces bigheadedopportunists who need position, applause and plenty of perks to keep them happy. The most successful prosperity preacher is the most dangerous because he can convince a crowd that Jesus died to give you and me a Lexus.

4. It works against the formation of Christian character. The prosperity message is a poor imitation of the gospel because it leaves no room for brokenness, suffering, humility or delay. It offers an illegal shortcut. Prosperity preachers promise instant results and overnight success; if you don’t get your breakthrough, it’s because you didn’t give enough money in the offering. Jesus calls us to deny ourselves and follow Him; prosperity preaching calls us to deny Jesus and follow our materialistic lusts. There is a leadership crisis in the African church because many pastors are so set on getting rich, they can’t go through the process of discipleship that requires self-denial.

5. It actually keeps people in poverty. The government of Malawi is currently under international scrutiny because of fraud carried out by top leaders. The saddest thing about the so-called “Cashgate” scandal is that professing Christians in the administration of President Joyce Banda have been implicated. One of these people stole millions of kwacha from the government and hid the cash in a teddy bear! Most people today in Malawi live on less than $1 a day, yet their leaders have been known to buy fleets of cars and huge plots of land with money that was not theirs. Sadly, the prosperity gospel preached in Malawi has encouraged pastors and leaders to follow the same corrupt pattern. As a result, God’s people have been financially exploited.

When Jesus described false prophets as wolves in sheep’s clothing, He warned us to examine their fruit. Matthew 7:17 says, “So every good tree bears good fruit, but the bad tree bears bad fruit” (NASB). What is the fruit of prosperity preaching?

Churches have been growing rapidly in many parts of Africa today, yet sub-Saharan Africa is the only region in the world where poverty has increased in the past 25 years. So according to the statistics, the prosperity gospel is not bringing prosperity! It is a flawed message, but I believe God will use selfless, broken African leaders to correct it.

SOURCE

North Korean Christians Pray for ‘Free’ Christians to ‘Realize God is All You Need’ – Angela Lu

One of the first things Eric Foley, the co-founder of Seoul USA, learned about the North Korean underground church is that it is not a group to be pitied. About 10 years ago Foley asked a member of the underground church how he could pray for them. He recalls the North Korean’s response, “You, pray for us? We pray for you … because South Korean and American churches believe challenges in the Christian faith are solved by money, freedom, and politics. It’s only when all you have is God do you realize God is all you need.”

Foley estimates about 100,000 Christians live in North Korea, with about a third of them in concentration camps. Unlike the Chinese underground church, North Korean Christians can’t risk gathering together because spies are everywhere. Instead, they worship in their own household or in the common areas, like while walking down the road out of earshot.

As North Korea fell under Communist rule after World War II, Christians realized they would soon face intense persecution. Some escaped to South Korea, where they could worship freely, but those who stayed chose four foundational pillars of Christianity they could pass on to future generations: theology through the Apostle’s Creed, prayer through the Lord’s Prayer, ethics through the Ten Commandments, and worship through the Lord’s supper. At least one of these elements is present in each of the North Korean underground churches.

To learn more about the Bible, Christians who are able to leave the country on work trips meet with missionaries and memorize Scripture to share with others. Physical copies of the Bible are rare for poor households, as government officials regularly check their homes. If officials find a Bible, the government will send the family to concentration camps or kill them. Seoul USA has been able to send Bibles over to North Korea using balloons — 50,000 Bibles dropped into the country this past year. The group also produces short-wave radio programs with North Korean defectors reading the Bible, as about 20 percent of North Koreans illegally own radios.

The government deems Christianity a threat because North Korea’s Juche ideology, which mixes Marxism with worship of the “Great Leader” Kim Il Sung and his family, is partially copied from Christianity. Kim, who attended church until eighth grade, took Christian concepts like the trinity, church services, and hymns and made it all about himself. If people found out about Christ, they’d see Kim and his lineage as the frauds they are.

With a zero-tolerance policy for Christianity, Christians are careful who they tell about their faith. They don’t reveal their belief to their spouses until years after marriage, and they can’t tell their children until they turn 15, as teachers are trained to extract such information from students.

Foley found that children of Christian families don’t even realize they’re sitting in an underground church meeting. One man said every week his grandfather would gather the family together and give them the same 10 pieces of advice. Later he realized his grandfather was passing down the Ten Commandments.

Foley has also met defectors who “know Bible stories told differently or some Christian songs. North Korean Christians are very careful to pass on the treasure and for their family members to guard it and only over time realize what it is.”

Members of the church have told Foley they see concentration camps as just another mission field — North Korean officials have had to separate Christians from other prisoners because they keep sharing the gospel. Faced with such danger, North Korean defectors are often disappointed with what they see in the South Korean church.

“They are sad to see the faith is very different from their own,” Foley said. “The North Korean faith life is built upon this idea of being faithful to carry out what God has given you to do even in the face of impossible opposition.”

While many South Korean and U.S. groups want to help North Korean Christians escape the country, defectors often have a hard to readjusting to their new homes: 16 percent of them end up committing suicide. Seoul USA sees its role as discipling the church in North Korea by providing resources like the radio and Bibles, as well as starting Underground University to train North Korean defectors to become missionaries to their own people.

So as churches gather for the International Day of Prayer for the Persecuted Church (IDOP) on Nov. 3 (Nov. 10 for some churches and organizations), Foley hopes Western churches realize they have much to learn from their North Korean brethren.

“IDOP too often becomes pray for the poor persecuted Christian. We want to challenge that idea: Freedom in Christ is something you can have even in the darkest corner of the world.”

c. 2013 WORLD News Service. 

Publication date: November 4, 2013

(Video + Audio) TIV – What Is The Matter?

The Inspired Voices (T.I.V) of Komole fame featuring Vector and Provabs, have once again succeeded in creating that unique blend of European sound and African rhythm with their new single, “What is the matter?”
Produced by A2 (producer of Komole) and mixed by Sheyman, this song is fast-paced, energetic, banging and lyrically on-point.
The video was directed by Akin Alabi and shot at a shipping terminal in Lagos. It brings something fresh to the table as it features new and unique dance moves on containers and heavy-duty forklifts by over 20 dancers.The video is colorful, engaging, highly entertaining and is bound to set a new trend of creative dance moves in Africa.
This video is more special as it’s been released a day after the award-winning husband and wife duo of Akin & Bunmi Alabi who make up T.I.V, were blessed with a baby boy. Enjoy!