PASTOR E.A. ADEBOYE OF RCCG SPEAKS ON ISSUES LIKE MAKE-UP, JEWELLERY, WIGS & BLEACHED HAIR.

‘The elders have a saying, “if children of the same mother enters into a room to talk and come out smiling, they have not told each other the truth.” Alright, so in the next 3 minutes, you might not be smiling as I am going to tell you the truth, because am your daddy.

Strictly speaking I have searched the scripture, there is nowhere that I have found where it is written, if you wear make-up, you will go to hell or you will not make it to heaven, I can’t find it in the Bible. It is not to be found anywhere at all, but I have done my own research.

There are two places in the whole Bible where references were made to painting of face, only two places, and the two places are bad. One of the places talked about Jezebel. How many of you will name your daughter Jezebel? 2 Kings 9:30, the day Jezebel was going to die, she did make up properly, painted her face, dented her face with jewelries, but at the end of the day, dog ate her.

The second place is in Jeremiah 4:29-30 where God was speaking in anger to daughters of Zion, He says, “when I make up my mind to deal with you, you can paint your face as you like, it is not going to deliver you.” Read it, you have your Bible to read. Those are the only two places I found, and they are terrible references.

Now as far as am concerned, it is up to you to decide how you want to look, you want to make up, you want to paint yourself, you are at liberty. If for any reason whatsoever God decides not to allow you to enter heaven, sorry o!!! The point I’m making is this, nobody ever add sugar to honey. Have you seen anybody adding sugar to honey? Anytime you see a piece of furniture that is painted, wooden furniture that is painted, the wood is inferior. When the wood is ebony, nobody paints it, no no no. I think children of God should realise they are precious enough, by the special grace of God and by the shed blood of Jesus Christ. They are honey, they don’t need sugar.
Some people go about in the name of fashion wearing wigs. I’m not being judgemental at all.

This is not law, there is no where in the Bible which says if you wear wigs, you can’t make it to heaven. But this hair that you are wearing, from whose head was it cut? Do you know who was the original owner of the hair? Do you know what kind of anointing is in that hair? It is put in the most important part of your body, the head!!! “Thou anointed my head.” Things are so bad now that some ladies come for ordination with wigs on. I always asked them, which one do you want me to anoint, the wig or the head? I told you, you will not smile by the time I finished. I have not been legalistic, I have not said thou shall not wear wig. I’m only talking to my daughters, my own children.

I read something in the book of Revelation 7:1-3. Some angels were sent from heaven to deal with the inhabitants of the world, after the rapture, the Bible says, “I heard the Almighty God said, before you begin to deal with people, let me mark them, let me seal them on their forehead, so that we know those that the bullet should not hit.” What we wear matters. Why do you think the army wear uniforms? It is so that they will not accidentally shoot their own members. Can God recognize you at a glance, that is, as a child of God? Some people say it does not matter, and that what is inside is what is important, I agree with the last part, but what is inside will show outside. it will show on the outside, it will show, don’t let anybody deceive you.

When I became the General Overseer, I brought a group of teachers to come and teach in the Bible College and they began to teach series of things I did not bargain for. They were teaching that God is not interested in the outside, He is interested in the inside, this man (the G. O.) is legalistic, he is too strict. So I went to Oyingbo market to buy two oranges, one ripe and the other green all over. My Bible students were beginning to turn to rebels and God gave me wisdom, so I stood before the class and I said, which of this oranges will you take if I ask you to pick one? They all pointed at the yellow and ripe one, and I said why? They said because that one is going to be the sweeter one. How do you know when you have not seen the inside? They all said what is inside the orange portrays and shows what is reflecting outside. An orange is sweet from the appearance because its inside is sweet and vice versa to unripe oranges. It was at this point l passed the real message to the people and the Holy Spirit gave them change of heart afterwards.

People of God, God cannot be mocked, you cannot begin to tell people that God only dwells in the heart of man, seeks the heart alone and not the facial appearance, It is A LIE FROM THE PIT OF HELL ! You cannot sit on the fence, it either you are cold or hot… Say no to FASHION OF HELL … Why not be and remain the way God created you? Why are you adding to what God has created? In other words, you are telling God that, “God ooh, see you are senseless to have created me this way I am, I am going to recreate myself back with make ups.” (God forbid). May you not be an enemy of God. Amen. “Let your dressing be in modest apparell, not of painting of face or using of gold ,necklaces or earrings, but of pure heart , shamefacedness and modesty.”

Have you considered Jezebel in the Bible? She was a perfect example of the usage of all these things, and she made all these things of demonic value. May you not be among her descendants in Jesus mighty name. Let your watchword be ”WORLDLINESS FORBIDDEN.” Instead of the world copying good things from us (believers), we the believers are the one copying bad things from the world! Very shameful and pathetic!

Remember, “friendliness with the world equals to enmity with God. Beware of the end time vices and change your ways now!

What is your take one it?

5 Uncomfortable Issues The Church Needs to Talk About

It has been said that the Church is not a museum of saints, but a hospital for sinners. Yet, most of us would much rather pretend to be a saint on display than call for an ambulance.

Week after week, many of us walk into a church, sit by people we have known for years and yet would never dream of sharing our innermost struggles with. While a large part of this is our pride, another factor is a Church that seems unwilling to talk about certain uncomfortable issues, choosing rather to ignore them, try to cover them up or simply reject people who bring them up.

There are many issues the Church as a whole needs to address, such as creationism, activism, environmental stewardship and many others. But there are many more issues that individuals in the Church are dealing with—issues that the Church Body should be talking about. In Galatians 6:2, Paul urged the Church to “Bear each other’s burdens,” so maybe with more grace and love we can turn on the light in the darkened rooms of each other’s hearts and let our churches become safe havens for the uncomfortable things we have to deal with.

Many of these issues need to be dealt with professionally first. But that should not be the end of it. Research shows just listening to someone and showing them you genuinely care for their situation can be a huge part of that person’s healing process.

This is far from a comprehensive list—these are a few of the issues many people in churches around the world are dealing with, whether they admit it or not. And as people increasingly leave the Church, often over issues such as these, it is becoming more urgent that the Church talk about how to care for every one of its members.

Addiction

At AA meetings and therapy sessions, talking about addiction makes sense, but for some reason, it’s not a topic most church people want to hear about. Certain addictions are definitely more socially acceptable to talk about than others. For example, it’s OK to bug Frank about his smoking, but John’s alcoholism is more hush-hush.

And yes, in many churches, a person’s addictions can become fodder for gossip. However, if the Church were to first approach one another as family, then addicts in the Church might feel safer to be vulnerable about their struggles. Often, they just need to be loved and feel safe enough to know they can expose this part of themselves in a community where the addiction isn’t crushing them every second.

Sexuality

Sex and sexuality tends to be a loaded topic in the Church. Certain corners of the Church have been very vocal in their broad condemnation of premarital sex, but that’s where the conversation (for lack of a better word) tends to stop. We rarely engage the topic of sex on a personal, individual level. There’s a generally accepted idea floating around that, once two people are married, they enter into a carefree, blissful lifetime of sexual fulfillment that needs never be discussed in any meaningful way.

There are strong believers struggling with their sexual identity, brokenness and frustration in churches across the world, and among their Christian friends and families, they don’t dare say a word about it.

 

I know of a few people in my life who love Christ and want to abstain from sin, but they are struggling with sexual sin or sinful desires. There are married couples for whom waiting to have sex turned out to be the easy part, as both parties brought into their marriage a series of expectations that turned out to be flawed. There are very few people they can share this with, but that also means they carry this burden alone. If many churches stopped treating sexual issues as a personal choice, where it could be turned on or off like a light-switch, then maybe we could start to create more safe places where people can share their burdens with each other and find out they’re not alone.

Sincere Doubt

In many churches today, there are Christians, even pastors, who are struggling with doubt. They have absorbed all the recommended apologetics. They havecried out in prayer. They are struggling to believe that God is good or that He’s there at all, yet they continue with the motions. They put on the smile while setting up the coffee table. They mouth along to the words in the worship songs, but it all feels hollow to them. I know this because I’ve been one of these people.

One of the most vital ways the Church can handle doubt is to stop acting like everything about faith is obvious. The Church can recognize that we all have doubts from time to time, but we cling to a hope that’s beyond rational explanation. Churches can also stop trying to hide the hard parts of the Bible under the rug or downplay the significance these ethically questionable parts play in a person’s doubt.

Mental Illness

Those in our midst who deal with mental illness, either personally or second-hand, are typically silent about the struggles they experience. In our society, there still exist a lot of stereotypes about mental illness, and because people either don’t want to deal with it or they’ve been hurt, they will choose to avoid opening up about it. The problem is, if these issues go untalked about, then they often will go unresolved.

In some churches, people who do reveal their illness will go without professional help in lieu of prayer. When prayer doesn’t work, the person dealing with mental illness feels like a failure or like they don’t have enough faith. The Church needs to create an encouraging environment where people can be directed to right help and then receive spiritual healing alongside their physical healing.

Loneliness

There are droves of lonely people in the church, and that includes senior pastors and priests. The isolation comes from a lack of identification and identification comes through open communication. When we can be vulnerable and honest with one another, we understand each other in a profound way.

A lonely person may walk in to a church alone and leave alone each Sunday. Although they appreciate the free coffee and donuts the fellowship hall offers, what they really want is fellowship. Taking time to get to know the people around you and then reaching out to them outside of the church will allow for a greater, more stable community.

Of course, every church is different and while one church may be stronger in one area, it may be weaker in others. These are just a few issues that we as the Church Body need to be willing to address. And as we talk about them, we must remember to address them with humility, understanding and grace, keeping in mind our role as fellow hospital patients, not museum curators.

SOURCE

5 Uncomfortable Issues The Church Needs to Start Talking About

 

It has been said that the Church is not a museum of saints, but a hospital for sinners. Yet, most of us would much rather pretend to be a saint on display than call for an ambulance.

Week after week, many of us walk into a church, sit by people we have known for years and yet would never dream of sharing our innermost struggles with. While a large part of this is our pride, another factor is a Church that seems unwilling to talk about certain uncomfortable issues, choosing rather to ignore them, try to cover them up or simply reject people who bring them up.

There are many issues the Church as a whole needs to address, such as creationism, activism, environmental stewardship and many others. But there are many more issues that individuals in the Church are dealing with—issues that the Church Body should be talking about. In Galatians 6:2, Paul urged the Church to “Bear each other’s burdens,” so maybe with more grace and love we can turn on the light in the darkened rooms of each other’s hearts and let our churches become safe havens for the uncomfortable things we have to deal with.

Many of these issues need to be dealt with professionally first. But that should not be the end of it. Research shows just listening to someone and showing them you genuinely care for their situation can be a huge part of that person’s healing process.

This is far from a comprehensive list—these are a few of the issues many people in churches around the world are dealing with, whether they admit it or not. And as people increasingly leave the Church, often over issues such as these, it is becoming more urgent that the Church talk about how to care for every one of its members.

Addiction

At AA meetings and therapy sessions, talking about addiction makes sense, but for some reason, it’s not a topic most church people want to hear about. Certain addictions are definitely more socially acceptable to talk about than others. For example, it’s OK to bug Frank about his smoking, but John’s alcoholism is more hush-hush.

And yes, in many churches, a person’s addictions can become fodder for gossip. However, if the Church were to first approach one another as family, then addicts in the Church might feel safer to be vulnerable about their struggles. Often, they just need to be loved and feel safe enough to know they can expose this part of themselves in a community where the addiction isn’t crushing them every second.

Sexuality

Sex and sexuality tends to be a loaded topic in the Church. Certain corners of the Church have been very vocal in their broad condemnation of premarital sex, but that’s where the conversation (for lack of a better word) tends to stop. We rarely engage the topic of sex on a personal, individual level. There’s a generally accepted idea floating around that, once two people are married, they enter into a carefree, blissful lifetime of sexual fulfillment that needs never be discussed in any meaningful way.

 

There are strong believers struggling with their sexual identity, brokenness and frustration in churches across the world, and among their Christian friends and families, they don’t dare say a word about it. I know of a few people in my life who love Christ and want to abstain from sin, but they are struggling with sexual sin or sinful desires. There are married couples for whom waiting to have sex turned out to be the easy part, as both parties brought into their marriage a series of expectations that turned out to be flawed. There are very few people they can share this with, but that also means they carry this burden alone. If many churches stopped treating sexual issues as a personal choice, where it could be turned on or off like a light-switch, then maybe we could start to create more safe places where people can share their burdens with each other and find out they’re not alone.

Sincere Doubt

In many churches today, there are Christians, even pastors, who are struggling with doubt. They have absorbed all the recommended apologetics. They havecried out in prayer. They are struggling to believe that God is good or that He’s there at all, yet they continue with the motions. They put on the smile while setting up the coffee table. They mouth along to the words in the worship songs, but it all feels hollow to them. I know this because I’ve been one of these people.

One of the most vital ways the Church can handle doubt is to stop acting like everything about faith is obvious. The Church can recognize that we all have doubts from time to time, but we cling to a hope that’s beyond rational explanation. Churches can also stop trying to hide the hard parts of the Bible under the rug or downplay the significance these ethically questionable parts play in a person’s doubt.

Mental Illness

Those in our midst who deal with mental illness, either personally or second-hand, are typically silent about the struggles they experience. In our society, there still exist a lot of stereotypes about mental illness, and because people either don’t want to deal with it or they’ve been hurt, they will choose to avoid opening up about it. The problem is, if these issues go untalked about, then they often will go unresolved.

In some churches, people who do reveal their illness will go without professional help in lieu of prayer. When prayer doesn’t work, the person dealing with mental illness feels like a failure or like they don’t have enough faith. The Church needs to create an encouraging environment where people can be directed to right help and then receive spiritual healing alongside their physical healing.

Loneliness

There are droves of lonely people in the church, and that includes senior pastors and priests. The isolation comes from a lack of identification and identification comes through open communication. When we can be vulnerable and honest with one another, we understand each other in a profound way.

A lonely person may walk in to a church alone and leave alone each Sunday. Although they appreciate the free coffee and donuts the fellowship hall offers, what they really want is fellowship. Taking time to get to know the people around you and then reaching out to them outside of the church will allow for a greater, more stable community.

Of course, every church is different and while one church may be stronger in one area, it may be weaker in others. These are just a few issues that we as the Church Body need to be willing to address. And as we talk about them, we must remember to address them with humility, understanding and grace, keeping in mind our role as fellow hospital patients, not museum curators.

SOURCE